The view from my window

Brussels, Belgium

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Life

Jeremy Hackett’s beautiful cottage in Stockwell

Jeremy Hackett's Stockwell study

I have admired both Jeremy Hackett’s taste and his entrepreneurialism for as long as I have known his story. Today I discovered this 2014 piece from the Evening Standard on Jeremy Hackett’s cottage in Stockwell, which he redesigned with Guy Goodfellow.

There are a couple of things that I would have done differently. I can’t help but imagine how much better a retro television would look in place of the incongruous LCD in the drawing room, and I would not have chosen at least four of the frames that you can see in that shot. However, the overall approach and style is absolute stunning: it manages to be wonderfully casual and neat at the same time. To have that eye.

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Economics

Paul Mason on World Factory

Paul Mason writes in The Guardian‘s Comment is Free:

In Zoe Svendsen’s play World Factory at the Young Vic, the audience becomes the cast. Sixteen teams sit around factory desks playing out a carefully constructed game that requires you to run a clothing factory in China. How to deal with a troublemaker? How to dupe the buyers from ethical retail brands? What to do about the ever-present problem of clients that do not pay? Because the choices are binary they are rarely palatable. But what shocked me – and has surprised the theatre – is the capacity of perfectly decent, liberal hipsters on London’s south bank to become ruthless capitalists when seated at the boardroom table.

I have played a similar game, with a similar outcome. I was less surprised that Paul Mason appears to be. This is perhaps because his stock in trade is writing like a 12-year old, with all the naivety and fundamental misunderstandings that this brings. Nowhere is this clearer than in his final paragraph:

…to make a third industrial revolution happen needs something no individual factory boss can execute: the re-regulation of capitalism into something better.

This comes close to a verbatim rendition of the anti-market criticism John Kay has repeatedly skewered:

The critique of the market economy today is, as it has been since the end of socialism, largely incoherent – an incoherence nicely captured in the demonstrator’s slogan ‘capitalism should be replaced by something nicer’.

I’d suggest Mason reads some Kay. This piece may be a good start, as a warm up to this (disclosure: I worked on the report).

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The view from my window

Brussels, Belgium

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The view from my window

Lanercost, United Kingdom

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The view from my window

Warrington, United Kingdom

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